Your host, Peter Grant

45 croppedPhoto by Molly Grant, June 2013.

I am the author of seven books about Victoria and Vancouver Island:

Victoria from Sidney to Sooke: An Altitude SuperGuide (1994)
Victoria a History in Photographs (1995)
The Story of Sidney (1997)
Wish You Were Here: Life on Vancouver Island in Historical Postcards (2002)
Vancouver Island Book of Everything (2008, second edition 2015)
Vancouver Island Book of Musts (2010)
Vancouver Island: Imagine (2014, co-author)

Having lived in Oak Bay for close to fifty years, I’m now writing a book about my home range.

Feel free to send a message or ask a question at petergrant(at)shaw.ca.

Cheers!

15 thoughts on “Your host, Peter Grant”

  1. Wow! Really looking fwd to finished product…..is this where the Keith story is? Just back from long w/e at D &T’s newly acquired lake house only an hour n of the city….reminds me of Bowen, but much more space, and an acre of flat, no-bank lakefront w little sandy beach…perfect for small boyz!

  2. Ask and ye shall receive … This is where the Keith story will be — it’s only Day 1 — and the Husband story … the Westinghouse story … Clark … Skelton … Oliver … Rattenbury … the whole gang … stay tuned …

  3. I’d be agreeing that Donald was probably afflicted by what we “talked” about two days ago in his recounting of his ancestor’s sailing activities in BC/Ak waters in 1831.

    I’ll be looking forward to the new stuff!

  4. Hey Peter! Fantastic! Back to work, eh? Miss the OB Rec Centre and my friends, you and everyone, but it doesn’t rain here, as I said, Santa Fe is my “brown town” and Victoria is my “green town” . . . I look forward to seeing you when I can visit! This project looks really interesting, and well done!
    X Erin

  5. Just attended your talk last night at Windsor Park. I again realized what a small world we live in as you began to speak about the Johnston family. I am currently reading the 1934 editions of The Colonist and I just found this article on Monday.
    *
    September 18, 1934, 3 – died recently at Colima, Mexico, Robert Henry Johnston, 63, eldest son of Philip Thomas & Agnes Johnston. The father was a pioneer resident of Victoria [1862]. He was born 1871 in Victoria and resided in Mexico for 26 years. Leaves widow, 4 children, in Mexico, 2 sisters, brother.
    *

    1. This is why your work is so valuable Leona – otherwise such information would probably be lost. A fascinating family, eh? Glad you could make it to the talk.

    2. Interesting how families intertwine. Phillip Johston’s daughter Esther married James Stirling Floyd, mentioned above as building a home in 1888 on Mt. Baker Ave. J.S.Floyd was Oak Bay’s clerk at incorporation and then carried on as Auditor for Oak Bay, Saanich and Victoria until his death in the 1930’s. There are quite a few of their descendants still in Greater Victoria.

  6. Hi Peter — I’m writing a biography of Reginald Heber Pidcock, whose daughter Margaret married Edward Purcell Johnston — who I believe may have been related to you. I’m hoping to find someone who has tracked the history of the Johnston family, in hopes you have photos and stories that may relate to this book I’m working on. I believe the Johnstons and Reginald’s wife’s (Alice Guillod) family were friends in Eng, before they emigrated. I think Alice came to Canada in 1872 with one of Philip Thomas’ sisters — and would really like to know her first name.

    As a p.s. to this — I’m Leona Taylor’s sister, who I see a note to you from above. Just a coincidence — historian sisters….

    Cheers, Jeanette Taylor, Quadra Island, BC

  7. Hi, Peter, new to Victoria and familiarizing myself with the history and geography of the area, in particular Victoria and Oak Bay. Thanks for making this information available online.
    Cheers, Don

  8. We are looking for informati about Henderson Hill for a student at St. Margaret’s school. She is 10 years old. Could you help

    1. Henderson Hill? Never heard the term before. Could it be the hill on Henderson Road from Neil St to Lansdowne Road? It was part of Uplands Farm from 1850, used by Chinese farmers for growing vegetables, and became a suburb in the 1950s. If that’s the place, i can give you sources.

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